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VS Code without Micosoft branding/telemetry/licensing

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This is not a fork. This is a repository of scripts to automatically build Microsoft's vscode repository into freely-licensed binaries with a community-driven default configuration.

Table of Contents

Download/Install

🎉 🎉 Download latest release here 🎉 🎉

More info / helpful tips are here.

Install with Brew (Mac)

If you are on a Mac and have Homebrew installed:

brew cask install vscodium

Note for Mac OS X Mojave users: if you see "App can't be opened because Apple cannot check it for malicious software" when opening VSCodium the first time, you can right-click the application and choose Open. This should only be required the first time opening on Mojave.

Install with Chocolatey (Windows)

If you use Windows and have Chocolatey installed (thanks to @Thilas):

choco install vscodium

Install with Scoop (Windows)

If you use Windows and have Scoop installed:

scoop bucket add extras
scoop install vscodium

Install with snap (Linux)

VSCodium is available in the Snap Store as Codium, published by the Snapcrafters community. If your Linux distribution has support for snaps:

snap install codium

Install with Package Manager (Linux)

You can always install using the downloads (deb, rpm, tar) on the releases page, but you can also install using your favorite package manager and get automatic updates. @paulcarroty has set up a repository with instructions here. Any issues installing VSCodium using your package manager should be directed to that repository's issue tracker.

Install on Arch Linux

VSCodium is available in AUR as package vscodium-bin, maintained by @plague-doctor.

Flatpak Option (Linux)

VSCodium is (unofficially) available as a Flatpak app here and the build repo is here. If your distribution has support for flatpak, and you have enabled the flathub repo:

flatpak install flathub com.vscodium.codium

flatpak run com.vscodium.codium

Why Does This Exist

This repository contains build files to generate free release binaries of Microsoft's VSCode. When we speak of "free software", we're talking about freedom, not price.

Microsoft's downloads of Visual Studio Code are licensed under this not-FLOSS license and contain telemetry/tracking. According to this comment from a Visual Studio Code maintainer:

When we [Microsoft] build Visual Studio Code, we do exactly this. We clone the vscode repository, we lay down a customized product.json that has Microsoft specific functionality (telemetry, gallery, logo, etc.), and then produce a build that we release under our license.

When you clone and build from the vscode repo, none of these endpoints are configured in the default product.json. Therefore, you generate a "clean" build, without the Microsoft customizations, which is by default licensed under the MIT license

This repo exists so that you don't have to download+build from source. The build scripts in this repo clone Microsoft's vscode repo, run the build commands, and upload the resulting binaries to GitHub releases. These binaries are licensed under the MIT license. Telemetry is disabled.

If you want to build from source yourself, head over to Microsoft's vscode repo and follow their instructions. This repo exists to make it easier to get the latest version of MIT-licensed VSCode.

Microsoft's build process (which we are running to build the binaries) does download additional files. This was brought up in Microsoft/vscode#49159 and Microsoft/vscode#45978. These are the packages downloaded during build:

More Info

Documentation

For more information on getting all the telemetry disabled and tips for migrating from Visual Studio Code to VSCodium, have a look at this Docs page.

Extensions and the Marketplace

According to the VS Code Marketplace Terms of Use, you may only install and use Marketplace Offerings with Visual Studio Products and Services. For this reason, VSCodium uses open-vsx.org, an open source registry for VS Code extensions. See the Extensions + Marketplace section on the Docs page for more details.

Please note that some Visual Studio Code extensions have licenses that restrict their use to the official Visual Studio Code builds and therefore do not work with VSCodium. See this note on the Docs page for what's been found so far and possible workarounds.

How are the VSCodium binaries built?

If you would like to see the commands we run to build vscode into VSCodium binaries, have a look at the .travis.yml file (for Linux and OS X builds) and the win32-build.yml file (for Windows builds). These build files call all the other scripts in the repo. If you find something that doesn't make sense, feel free to ask about it on Gitter.

The builds are run every day, but exit early if there isn't a new release from Microsoft. To examine the build logs, go here for Linux / OS X and here for Windows

Supported OS

  • OS X (zip, dmg)
  • Linux x64 (deb, rpm, AppImage, tar.gz)
  • Linux x86 (deb, rpm, tar.gz) (up to v1.35.1)
  • Linux arm64 (deb, tar.gz)
  • Linux armhf (deb, tar.gz)
  • Windows x64
  • Windows x86

Donate

If you would like to support the development of VSCodium, feel free to send BTC to 3PgjE95yzBDTrSPxPiqoxSgZFuKPPAix1N.

License

MIT


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debjitbis08
62 days ago
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fxer
62 days ago
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Nice that exists and is MIT licensed
Bend, Oregon

How an Inmate Made a Big Math Discovery in Prison | Number Theory

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an inmate's letter to a mathematician

Marta Cerruti

  • A new number theory paper comes from three academic researchers and, astonishingly, one prison inmate.
  • Number theory is full of complex problems with applications in cryptography and more.
  • The paper is on continued fractions, which are a way to approximate irrational numbers.

Earlier this year, a first-time academic author published a new mathematical study in the journal Research in Number Theory. The twist? The researcher, Christopher Havens, is also serving a 25-year sentence in the Washington Department of Correction following a murder conviction.

Inmates often send requests to publishers and publications, because access to specific books and even entire genres of books are extremely limited in prisons. The guidelines are byzantine, and prisoner rights organizations hold up restricted access to books as an example of a violation of the First Amendment.

It’s in this context that chemist and professor Marta Cerruti’s partner received a request from Havens for an annual subscription to the Princeton-based journal Annals of Mathematics. And it happens that Cerruti’s father is a number theorist who was willing to take a chance on Havens, who was trying to teach himself calculus and number theory without any access to a qualified teacher.

“To test him, he gave Havens a problem to solve,” Cerruti recently wrote in The Conversation. “In return, my father received a 120-centimetre-long piece of paper in the mail, and on it was a long and complicated formula. [T]o his surprise, the results were correct!”

Umberto Cerruti, who was a professor of mathematics at the University of Torino, Italy, is one of the other authors on Havens’s paper, “Linear fractional transformations and nonlinear leaping convergents of some continued fractions.”

Number theory is the study of integers and what integers can do. It’s part of discrete mathematics, which examines countable numbers like integers rather than continuous topics like calculus. (The beginning steps of learning something like a Riemann sum are pretty discrete, but the goal of this exercise is to eventually approach infinity, which is continuous.)

Continued fractions are a fun special case of, for example, irrational numbers like π that can be represented with complicated fractions that also repeat. Instead of a series of digits that continue after a decimal point, they’re fractions that have more fractions in their denominators. These get smaller and smaller and eventually converge into approximations of the irrational numbers they can represent.

“There's no such thing as a closest rational approximation to an irrational number,” math writer Evelyn Lamb explained in Scientific American. “By increasing the denominators of our fractions, we can get as close as we want.”

In their paper, Havens, Cerruti, and two other mathematicians study a linear transformation of an infinite continued fraction and draw conclusions from their findings. Then they apply those findings back to (relatively speaking) famous continued fractions.

Havens told Cerruti he went through his prison’s Intensive Transition Program:

“It's designed to effectively aid you into 'taking your head from your backside.' This was my schedule. Eat, math, remove my head from my backside, brush, rinse, repeat. It was an important time in my life."

With a scholarly publication under his belt and about 16 more years in his sentence, Havens has an opportunity to continue to grow his mathematical talents—if he can keep finding the right pen pals.

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debjitbis08
73 days ago
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Tintin, Famous Boy Reporter, Applies For a Content Creator Job At a Digital Media Startup

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Salutations! My name is Tintin, and I’m an internationally famous boy reporter originally from Belgium. With my cadre of colorful friends and trusty dog Snowy by my side, I’ve traveled the world seeking out stories and uncovering criminal conspiracies — and today, my keen nose for adventure (not to mention the declining contributor rates at my usual outlets) has led me to the Digital Content Creator position at Quacker.com.

My interests and skillset dovetail perfectly with the requirements of this position as laid out in the job posting I sleuthed out on Indeed. I’m a multitasking go-getter obsessed with the trending news of the day — in fact, I once brought down a Chinese opium smuggling ring just for the scoop. Two to four years of digital content creation experience? Please. I’ve been turning leads into clicks since I was a teenager, from rescuing a mad scientist from Soviet thugs at 16 to finding buried treasure on a sunken pirate ship at 16 to masterminding a political coup in South America also at 16.

Any of the sheikhs whose children I’ve saved from ex-Nazi arms dealers can tell you that I’m an overachieving self-starter who measures success in terms of real results, whether that means cranking out dozens of typo-free posts a day or discovering a new element on a fallen asteroid in the Arctic Circle. Remind me to tell you about the time I went to Tibet and tracked down the Yeti — or better yet, I’ll make a sponsored TikTok about it faster than you can say “seamless brand integration.” I see you don’t offer benefits, but that’s okay — there weren’t any benefits in that ice cave, either.

I would thrive in Quacker’s fast-paced, ever-changing environment, having safely crash-landed multiple exploding planes and helicopters. Talk about a fire drill!

Just like Quacker, I’ve got a roll-up-your-sleeves work ethic, a can-do attitude, and a penchant for thinking outside the box. When I was held hostage by a hidden sect of a lost Incan society, I used a scrap of newspaper in my pocket to time my upcoming sacrificial burning to a solar eclipse. When the sun disappeared, the Incas thought the gods wanted me to live, and I was set free thanks to my creative problem-solving abilities. Those abilities also let me brainstorm and execute shareable, snackable digital content that effectively steers the online conversation.

On top of all that, I’m a bonafide page-view savant. You should have seen the readership numbers after I put away Al Capone at 16.

It’s increasingly important to be bilingual in today’s workplace, which is great since I speak both English and French. Also, I once got a herd of elephants to treat me as their king by communicating with them via hand-crafted wooden flute, so I’m happy to utilize those skills if anything like that comes up at Quacker.

As an employee, I’m equally comfortable taking an initiative solo or collaborating as part of a team that includes two idiotic Scotland Yard detectives, a hearing-impaired professor, and a crude Maria Callas stand-in. I’m also attaching a glowing letter of recommendation from Captain Haddock, an alcoholic middle-aged sea captain who is my best friend.

My packet is attached as well. I’m particularly proud of the following pieces:

  • Seven Things I Learned From Being Buried Alive In A Lost Egyptian Tomb
  • The Gorilla I Rescued From A Smuggler’s Hideout On A Mysterious Scottish Island: You Won’t Believe What He Looks Like Now
  • This One Hypnosis Trick That Aliens Used On Me After Beaming Me Up From An Erupting Volcano Will Change Your Life!

I’d also like to address the elephant in the room: in my early days, I engaged in some activities that were accepted back then but are viewed in a different light today. But who among us hasn’t tweeted some regrettable stuff, or made a joke they wish they could take back, or gone to the Congo on a mission trip to teach the people there about what a service imperial Belgium was doing for them? Times were different then, and I promise to make sure that the time I dynamited a critically endangered white rhinoceros for fun won’t be an unnecessary workplace distraction. Keep in mind, I was only 16 when I made those unfortunate mistakes, and now, as a 16-year-old, I’ve had a lot of time to reflect on the errors of my ways.

Relatedly, I’ve only interacted with, like, three different women in my life, so we might need a bit of onboarding for that.

In my career as a journalism professional, I’ve been drugged, hexed, assaulted, kidnapped, and left for dead. I’ve taken on organized crime, military dictatorships, slave traders, and unscrupulous antique dealers. I’ve survived executions, revolutions, and being injected with a poison that causes instant madness. But one thing I haven’t done yet is create high-quality posts at minimum wage on a freelance basis for a private equity-owned content aggregator based out of White Plains, New York. But in today’s media climate, a boy reporter’s gotta eat, right?

Thank you for the opportunity to apply to Quacker. I look forward to hearing back. Please.

PS. I was also the first man to walk on the moon. I was 16.

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debjitbis08
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Noted Philosophers Reconsider Their Key Insights After a Month of Social Distancing

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Sartre

1944: Hell is other people.

April 2020: All this time, I thought the problem was viewing myself through the lens of others’ subjectivities. Now I come to find that the problem has always been me. Take away other people, and all I do is play video games and eat Sara Lee frozen desserts. Hell is knowing this: I’m never going to refinish those goddamn kitchen cabinets, and I have no one to blame but myself.

- - -

Arendt

1963: Evil is not interesting, but instead stems from vacuity and stupidity; evil is banal.

April 2020: Ditto what I said there, but also, every single thing is not interesting. From this Hannah Arendt-shaped divot that’s formed in my couch, I hereby declare the banality of everything.

- - -

Plato

Ca. 360 B.C.E.: The human soul is a charioteer trying to drive, simultaneously, one bad horse and one noble one.

April 2020: This holds up for like a week. The noble horse asks your elderly neighbor if he needs help with anything. (He doesn’t.) The bad horse charts a rough looting strategy for the inevitable riot phase of the crisis. But numbness sets in quickly. Pretty soon your noble horse is just compulsively refreshing your state’s infection and fatality webpage. Your bad horse is too lazy to pick up the binoculars for a better peek through your other neighbor’s bedroom window. The human soul is a charioteer sleeping 14 hours a night but still napping 4 times a day.

- - -

Descartes

1637: I think, therefore I am.

April 2020: I was so lonely and disoriented, I started doubting the reality of everything, even myself. But if I didn’t exist, then how could I already have over a dozen subscribers on Spotify? I started a podcast this month, therefore I am.

- - -

Heidegger

1927: The human essence, Dasein, can only fully comprehend the meaning of its life when faced with the certainty of its death.

April 2020: Hoo boy, was I wrong. When faced with the certainty of death, people freeze dozens of gallons of milk. They make jokes complaining about their “coworkers” (who are really just their children and pets, because, working from home, get it?). They record parody performances of “One Day More.” I mean, don’t get me wrong, it’s adorable, I love it, but we’re not exactly achieving hard-won glimpses into the meaning of existence.

- - -

Nietzsche

1883: In the absence of God and conventional morality, the übermensch creates his own moral code.

April 2020: Oh my God, people, if I’ve said it once I’ve said it a thousand times: 5/8ths of a college degree and a plane ticket to a warm beach town do not make you the übermensch. Just follow the CDC guidelines, for Christ’s sake — that’s our new secular morality. And yeah, I said “oh my God” and “for Christ’s sake.” Deal with it.

- - -

Confucius

Ca. 500 BCE: Courteous, respectful support of one’s parents and elders is the foundation of civilized society.

April 2020: Nope. Your parents have chosen this moment to revive their teenage sense of invincibility, and for some reason they go to Costco like twice a day. The only way to get through to these dum-dums is to lose your shit. Just shriek at them until the ringing in their ears paralyzes them, and they have no choice but to stay home. Filial piety, my ass.

- - -

Kierkegaard

1844: Angst, the constant anxiety that is a defining feature of the human condition, stems from our consciousness of the unfettered freedom to choose.

April 2020: Great point, former me! Turns out when you have no choices, all your anxiety just melts away like snow in spring, or like glaciers in any season. That’s why this past month has been so existentially carefree!

- - -

Smith

1776: The invisible hand of the market will ensure that each self-interested economic act performed by an individual will ultimately benefit society as a whole.

April 2020: Shoot, y’all, in my day we didn’t even know about viruses, so how could I have foreseen a ventilator and mask shortage? My bad. If it’s any comfort, I tried to be a rational actor in a logical, self-regulating market, and now I’ve been out of toilet paper for three weeks. So let’s call it even?

- - -

Plato again

Ca. 375 B.C.E.: Society would be best ruled by a class of philosopher kings.

April 2020: Still kinda feeling it.

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debjitbis08
87 days ago
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hannahdraper
87 days ago
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Plato again
Ca. 375 B.C.E.: Society would be best ruled by a class of philosopher kings.

April 2020: Still kinda feeling it.
Washington, DC

If Andromeda Were Brighter, This Is What You’d See

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debjitbis08
103 days ago
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Tiny Helpers

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a collection of free single-purpose online tools for web developers
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200 days ago
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